Policing Research and the Rise of the 'Evidence-Base': Police Officer and Staff Understandings of Research, its Implementation and 'What Works'

Karen Lumsden*, Jackie Goode

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the pitfalls identified in previous critiques of the evidence-based practice movement in education, health, medicine and social care, recent years have witnessed its spread to the realm of policing. This article considers the rise of evidence-based policy and practice as a dominant discourse in policing in the UK, and the implications this has for social scientists conducting research in this area, and for police officers and staff. Social scientists conducting research with police must consider organisational factors impacting upon police work, as well as the wider political agendas which constrain it - in this case, the ways in which the adoption of evidence-based policing and the related 'gold standard' used to evaluate research act as a 'technology of power' to shape the nature of policing/research. The discussion draws on semi-structured interviews conducted with police officers and staff from police forces in England.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)813-829
Number of pages17
JournalSociology
Volume52
Issue number4
Early online date23 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Bibliographical note

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank the editors and the anonymous reviewers for their advice and suggestions. They would also like to thank the police forces and interviewees who took part in this project.

Funding
This study was funded by an Enterprise Project Grant (funded via HEFCE).

Keywords

  • evidence-base
  • implementation
  • knowledge
  • policing
  • social research
  • technologies of power

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Policing Research and the Rise of the 'Evidence-Base': Police Officer and Staff Understandings of Research, its Implementation and 'What Works''. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this