Reservoir properties and reactivity of the Faroe Islands Basalt Group: Investigating the potential for CO2 storage in the North Atlantic Igneous Province

Marija P. Rosenqvist*, Max W.J. Meakins, Sverre Planke, John M. Millett, Hans Jørgen Kjøll, Martin J. Voigt, Bjørn Jamtveit

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Offshore injection of CO2 into volcanic sequences of the North Atlantic Igneous Province may present a large-scale, permanent storage option through carbonate mineralization. To investigate this potential, onshore studies of reservoir properties and reactivity of the subaerially erupted Faroe Islands Basalt Group have been conducted. Outcrop and borehole samples reveal that the lava flow crusts commonly contain vesicles that have been filled with secondary minerals due to hydrothermal fluid circulation, however, unmineralized and highly porous layers do occur. Bulk density measurements, micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) image analysis, and microscope studies of samples from onshore boreholes give present-day porosities ranging from 0.5% to 36.2% in the volcanic sequences. The unmineralized brecciated lava flow crusts contain the largest estimated porosity and simulated absolute permeability (reaching up to 10−12 m2). µ-CT studies of the mineralized, brecciated flow crusts indicate initial porosities reaching up to 45%, before clogging. Kinetic experiments of rock dissolution show that the reactivity of the basalt and volcaniclastic sediments depends on the alteration state with more altered basalt being less reactive. However, the presence of reactive, high porosity, and high permeability flow crusts prior to clogging indicate the existence of promising and very large CO2 reservoirs in less altered offshore sequences.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103838
Number of pages21
JournalInternational journal of greenhouse gas control
Volume123
Early online date25 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We acknowledge funding from the University of Oslo through the Department of Geosciences, the European Research Council (ERC) through the ERC Advanced Grant Disequilibrium metamorphism of stressed lithosphere (DIME) (ERC-2015-AdG_669972), the Cambridge Arctic Shelf Program (CASP) through the Andrew Whitham CASP Fieldwork Awards 2020, and the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences at the University of Oslo through the project CO2Basalt. S. Planke acknowledges support from the Norwegian Research Council through center of Excellence funding to CEED (project no. 223272). H. J. Kjøll acknowledges AkerBP for funding through the project 8040 Paleocene. In addition, we thank the University of Iceland for covering the costs of the kinetic experiments. We would like to thank the Faroese Geological Survey (Jarðfeingi), Øyvind Hammer at the Museum of Natural History (Norway), Benjamin Bellwald at Volcanic Basin Energy Research (VBER), John Aiken from the Njord center, and Benoit Cordonnier from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France, for their contributions to the project. Finally, we thank Sigurður Gíslason and the Carbfix team for providing laboratory facilities and assistance during part of this research.

Funding Information:
We acknowledge funding from the University of Oslo through the Department of Geosciences, the European Research Council (ERC) through the ERC Advanced Grant Disequilibrium metamorphism of stressed lithosphere (DIME) ( ERC-2015-AdG_669972 ), the Cambridge Arctic Shelf Program (CASP) through the Andrew Whitham CASP Fieldwork Awards 2020, and the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences at the University of Oslo through the project CO2Basalt. S. Planke acknowledges support from the Norwegian Research Council through center of Excellence funding to CEED (project no. 223272 ). H. J. Kjøll acknowledges AkerBP for funding through the project 8040 Paleocene. In addition, we thank the University of Iceland for covering the costs of the kinetic experiments. We would like to thank the Faroese Geological Survey (Jarðfeingi), Øyvind Hammer at the Museum of Natural History (Norway), Benjamin Bellwald at Volcanic Basin Energy Research (VBER), John Aiken from the Njord center, and Benoit Cordonnier from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France, for their contributions to the project. Finally, we thank Sigurður Gíslason and the Carbfix team for providing laboratory facilities and assistance during part of this research.

Data Availability Statement

Data will be made available on request.


Keywords

  • Basalt carbonation
  • CO sequestration
  • Faroe Islands Basalt Group
  • Mineral carbonation
  • Mineral storage
  • North Atlantic Igneous Province

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