The Silence in Between: Governmentality and the Academic Voice in Tibetan Diaspora Studies.

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Abstract

This chapter examines the kind of ritual embedding within local landscapes that occurred at the individual monastic level carried on over into the diaspora, both at a monastic and a governmental level. Pre-1959 Tibetan governance seemed as embedded within cosmopologies if landscapes as local monasteries were. Initial impressions; however, seemed to indicate that many of these features had been jettisoned when the Tibetan Government-in-Exile was set up in Dharamsala. Within the crucible of this tension, moral practices exist for the formation of appropriate academic discourse on Tibetan religion and governance, practices that maintain a particular balance between active representation and silence. Monastic communities in Tibetan areas are institutionally organized around the Mulasarvastavadin code of discipline, and my initial pre-fieldwork studies of Tibetan and South Asian forms of Buddhist monasticism had pushed authors towards an initial research hypothesis.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCritical Journeys: The Making of Anthropologists
Place of PublicationCritical Journeys: The Making of Anthropologists
Pages191-206
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9780754680628
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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