Application of an algorithm to analyze patterns of intermittent oral corticosteroid use in asthma

John Haughney, Trung N Tran, Heath Heatley, Arnaud Bourdin, Andrew Menzies-Gow, David J Jackson, Ekaterina Maslova, Jatin Chapaneri, Derek Skinner, Victoria Carter, Jeffrey Shi Kai Chan, David Price* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

An algorithm to describe patterns of intermittent oral corticosteroid use in the UK (n = 476,167) found that one-third of patients receiving intermittent oral corticosteroids for asthma only had short gaps (<90 days) between oral corticosteroid prescriptions sometime during follow-up. The increasing frequency pattern was more likely in patients with greater asthma severity and with more short-acting β2-agonist use at baseline. Our approach may provide a clinically relevant representation of intermittent oral corticosteroid use in asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9
Number of pages5
Journalnpj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine
Volume33
Issue number1
Early online date4 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2023

Bibliographical note

Acknowledgements
This project is based in part/wholly on data from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database (opcrd.co.uk) obtained under licence from Optimum Patient Care Limited and its execution is approved by recognized experts affiliated to the Respiratory Effectiveness Group. However, the interpretation and conclusion contained in this manuscript are those of the authors alone. AstraZeneca funded the study and had a role in study design and data interpretation. The Observational & Pragmatic Research Institute had a role in study design and delivered the study protocol, data analysis, data interpretation and study report. The Observational & Pragmatic Research Institute received no funding for manuscript writing. The corresponding author had full access to all the data and had final responsibility to submit for publication. We would like to thank Sam Hijazi and Stefan Courtney for providing medical writing support, which was funded by AstraZeneca in accordance with Good Publication Practice (GPP3) guidelines (http://www.ismpp.org/gpp3).

Data Availability Statement

The dataset supporting the conclusions of this article was derived from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database (www.opcrd.co.uk). The OPCRD has ethical approval from the National Health Service (NHS) Research Authority to hold and process anonymised research data (Research Ethics Committee reference: 15/EM/0150). This study was approved by the Anonymised Data Ethics Protocols and Transparency (ADEPT) committee – the independent scientific advisory committee for the OPCRD. The authors do not have permission to give public access to the study dataset; researchers may request access to OPCRD data for their own purposes. Access to OCPRD can be made via the OCPRD website (https://opcrd.co.uk/our-database/data-requests/) or via the enquiries email info@opcrd.co.uk. The dataset supporting the conclusions of this article was derived from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database. We do not have permission to give public access to this database, however, researchers may request access for their own purposes, in accordance with AstraZeneca’s data sharing policy described at https://astrazenecagrouptrials.pharmacm.com/ST/Submission/Disclosure.

Keywords

  • Humans
  • Algorithms
  • Asthma
  • Adrenal Cortex Hormones
  • Prescriptions

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