Ibrutinib blocks Btk-dependent NF-ĸB and NFAT responses in human macrophages during Aspergillus fumigatus phagocytosis

Amelia Bercusson, Thomas Colley, Anand Shah, Adilia Warris, Darius Armstrong-James

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Abstract

Ibrutinib is a small molecule Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration for clinical use in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and as a second-line treatment of lymphoma and chronic graft-versus-host disease.1 An association with pulmonary aspergillosis was observed shortly after Ibrutinib was licensed for use.2 A recent phase Ib study of Ibrutinib treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma reported a 39% incidence of invasive aspergillosis, in patients concurrently treated with corticosteroids, in the absence of neutropenia.3 Studies of Aspergillus fumigatus infection in Btk−/− mice revealed focal pneumonia and large airway mucous plugs, mirroring findings in macrophage-depleted models of pulmonary aspergillosis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1985-1988
Number of pages4
JournalBlood
Volume132
Issue number18
Early online date18 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Bibliographical note

AB and AW are supported by the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award in Medical Mycology and Fungal Immunology (G097377). AS was funded by an MRC Clinical Research Fellowship (MR/K002708/1). AW is supported by the MRC Centre for Medical Mycology (MR/N006364/1) at the University of Aberdeen. DAJ is supported by a Wellcome Trust Seed Award (204566/Z/16/Z).

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