Karl Barth’s Theology of God as the Absolute Person: Decision and the Problem of the Counterfactuals

Sara Mannen* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

This article argues that the tension identified by maximalist interpreters in Barth's theology between his concrete identification of Jesus Christ with the essence of God and affirmation of counterfactual possibilities is motivated by Barth's theology that God is the absolute person. Barth's theology of divine personhood includes an element of self-mastery over Godself. It is demonstrated that Barth uses the concept of decision and counterfactual claims to secure God's Lordship over Godself and avoid any necessity of compulsion in God's actions. God is the absolute person, a self-determining and self-motivated intentional agent, which Barth utilises to secure God's irreducible, full presence in God's gracious turning towards us in revelation and reconciliation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-69
Number of pages27
JournalInternational Journal of Systematic Theology
Volume26
Issue number1
Early online date17 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jan 2024

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