The Story of Mark Weston: Re‐centring Histories and Conceptualising Gender Variance in 1930s International Sport

Sonja Erikainen* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

I always imagined I was a girl until 1928. Then, competing in the world [track and field] championships at Prague Czechoslovakia, I began to realize that I was not normal and had no right to compete as a woman. But I only had the courage to see a doctor this year, when a London specialist said I ought to undergo two operations. . . . In the hospital I was placed in a men’s ward. After seven weeks of mingling with men I begun to get the correct atmosphere, now it seems quite natural to be a man. I found the alteration in my life rather difficult at the beginning. When I though myself a girl I used to powder my face. I never used lip stick. Before the operation I always wore women’s clothing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-319
Number of pages16
JournalGender & History
Volume32
Issue number2
Early online date30 Apr 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jul 2020

Bibliographical note

I thank Steve Sturdy, Ben Vincent and the anonymous reviewers and editors of Gender & History for their useful comments on earlier drafts of this paper. I also acknowledge the support of the IOC Postgraduate Research Grant Programme, and the ESRC in funding the Sex Binaries, Performance Enhancement and Sport project (ES/S010602/1). Both contributed to the writing of this paper

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Story of Mark Weston: Re‐centring Histories and Conceptualising Gender Variance in 1930s International Sport'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this