“I Promised Growing up I Would Not Become a Teacher”: Exploring the Career Trajectory of a Language Teacher through Social Cognitive Career Theory

Ian Moodie, Vincent Troy Greenier* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Despite some research attention given to expatriate native-English-speaking teachers' (NESTs) identities and the national educational ideologies that have led to their international recruitment, surprisingly little research has addressed their career trajectories as TESOL professionals. To address this gap, this case study explores the career of a long-serving expatriate TESOL professional through the lens of Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT), which was designed to understand how people develop interest in, make decisions about, and commit to a particular career. The methods are qualitative, involving a deductive analysis of interview data and a career timeline according to constructs from SCCT. Despite an initial reluctance to enter the profession, the participant's interest in language teaching began after teaching part-time as a young adult. After this experience, he changed his career interests and continued his educational pursuits in Korea. His background contextual affordances, predispositions, learning experiences, and Korean language proficiency provided new opportunities and outcome expectations as he advanced his career. Although we focus on a single case, the SCCT model is further explored for its potential to better understand the factors involved in the development and commitment to a career in TESOL and for illustrating the career trajectories of TESOL professionals at scale.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)394-422
Number of pages29
JournalTESOL Quarterly
Volume58
Issue number1
Early online date23 May 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2024

Bibliographical note

Open Access via the Wiley Open Access Agreement

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